keybr.com – a great way to learn to type

I’ve recently come across (okay, I actively looked for it) a website that serves as a training program to help people learn to type.

I know, everyone knows how to type on a keyboard, but how many of us can type at 70wpm (words per minute) without looking down at the keys at least a few times?

According to keybr, ‘touch typing’ is ‘the ability to use muscle memory to find keys fast, without using the sense of sight,’ and it ‘significantly improves typing speed and eliminates errors … [it] simply makes you more productive and it is a skill worth learning’

Keybr‘s user-friendly interface.

As described on the website, keybr generates random (but readable) combinations of letters for users to practice with, which will help us get used to combinations commonly used in words, such as th, tion, and ous.

I gave it a try, and was instantly amazed by how clever it is. It started out by giving me only words with a few letters from the alphabet, before adding more and making the words more complex. The feedback is really helpful, and the profile page gives comprehensive data that shows us what’s going on.

(screenshot from keybr)

They even gave me a graph that shows my typing speed for each individual key, which should help me identify my weaknesses an improve:

My average typing speed has improved from 44wpm to 51wpm in just two days (30 minutes of practice per day), so it seems to be working for me.

If you’re looking to improve your typing speed or accuracy as well, I’d say give Keybr a try!


*update after a month of using keybr* (October 3rd, 2019)

A calendar in the ‘profile’ tab helps you keep track.

I didn’t practice every day, but I think I really improved from when I first came across this webtool, it not only increased, my typing speed, but also helped me look down at my fingers less.

A comparison of my statistics, 105 samples in vs 427.

‘Touch typing’ really helped me a lot because I can now look at a block of text and type as I read without going back and forth between my screen and the text (and my fingers!), I think this really increased my productivity.

For a long time, I thought typing skills were not worth spending the time to improve, but as you can see, with as little as 10 minutes of practice per day, it is possible to make working on a computer much, much easier!